As I am making a simpler regency outfit I needed a apron. In Sweden patterned aprons are common for many time periods, both striped and squares. And I happened to have a piece of thrifted linen fabric woven in white, unbleached and blue that seemed perfect.

Also check these pictures out, blue checked regency aprons in art.
London 1803
British 1820
Dutch 1803

I also wanted some pockets on the apron something that also can be found in the drawings from this time even if this one from France from 1824 is a tad bit late.

Regency Apron-1
As my dress is not floor length but a practical working length the apron follows this, the apron is 93cm long and 87cm wide. And it is pleated at the sides with a smooth front.

Regency Apron-2
The pockets are of a reasonable size, 23*16cm and I choose to put them under the pleating in the sides. This makes them “open up” a bit and are easy to use.

Regency Apron-3
I decided after it was finished that I needed shoulder straps on it. I can easily see myself get really annoyed by the apron creeping down to my waist. Happily thin shoulder straps on aprons are not uncommon in this period. Just look at this apron from 1824 France.

Regency Apron-5
I used a woven cotton ribbon as a tie. To make the waistband in the apron fabric and to have it extend a bit to the back before adding a woven cotton, linen or silk ribbon as tie is a common practise on Swedish aprons from 17 to 19th century.
I tie it of in the front as can be seen on many drawings from the time.

Regency Apron-4

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moose apron - sketch
The first project in school, to make something that covers your front when working in the workshop. I made a 1950 inspired apron with a half circle skirt and fitted bodice, and a swivel lobster clasps to be able to have some tools on my person without actually carrying them. The material for it is swedish moose.
moose apron - front
moose apron - back
moose apron - close up
moose apron - hook