Embroidered St. Birgittas cap

After having my old St. Brigitta’s cap for several years, and not really liking it that much. Well I like the cap itself as it is the best thing to pin your veils to, but it was a bit on the rough side with a bit to thick linen and also the band over the seam seemed like a good idea at the time but I don’t want it to show when wearing my frilled veils. Also the original cap have a lace embroidery over the head and in front on the band.

Making a new one is not that much work either, and the embroidery part was much easier than I thought.
I started by cutting the cap part out, in stead of sewing the back seam together I hemmed the two parts individually. Then I basted the cap to a thin cardboard that I had marked out some guide lines on to make it easier to embroider, the gap is 1cm wide and the markings are 0,5cm apart.
Embroidered St. Birgittas cap - 1
Embroidered St. Birgittas cap - 2

I used this excellent guide for the embroidery for the interlaced herringbone stitch.
I recommend looking at the guide in stead of my pictures, it is very clear. My pictures was mostly to show the progress on facebook.
I used a silk buttonhole tread for my embroidery, it became very delicate and nice, the original cap was probably embroidered with linen thread.

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At the end where the slit in the cap will be I made a bar by making buttonhole stitches over a couple of treads.

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In the front I made a embroidery inspired by this picture on Medieval Silkwork.

And this is how it looks when finished.
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And also how it looks when worn with a frilled veil, and also here with some flax cornettes I made a while ago. I love how the lace embroidery is seen under the veil.

If you want to make your own St. Birgitta’s cap here is a tutorial with a pattern.

16th century German – Dress

This tutorial is long due, I took most of the pictures two years ago so when I decided to redo the skirt on my 16th century German dress a couple of weeks ago I took the last pictures for the tutorial.

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Start out by cutting the shell fabric, I have a blue wool fabric that is slightly fulled. The back piece is cut on fold, but not the front piece, as it will open in front.

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The pattern is without seam allowances as you can see, I choose to have 1,5 cm seam allowance everywhere except the neckline and centre front, there the seam allowance is 1cm.

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The I cut my linen lining, I use my shell fabric as pattern pieces in stead of the paper patter, it lays better on the pattern and you can just cut them the same size, no measuring seam allowances a second time.

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Put the shell fabric and lining wrong sides together.

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Baste the two layers together, they will now be treated as one piece of fabric.

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Put the pieces right sides together and pin the shoulder and sides seams together, I have made a sewing line with a pen so that my stitches will be straight, these lines will never be seen so no need to use any special pens.

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I sew the shoulder and side seams with backstitches using waxed linen thread, as this is a tight garment so it is important that the seams hold up.

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Before sewing all the way down to the hem I cut away some of the lining, this is so that when the bodice is hemmed the lining won’t peak out.

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Then I take away the basting on the shoulder seams and side seams.

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The lining is cut down in all the seam allowances in side seams and shoulder seams, to make the seams less bulky and to make sure that the lining won’t peak out when the seams are felled.

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I press my seams flat with my iron and then I trim the seam allowances down to 1cm. You can start with smaller seam allowances from the start, but by cutting them at this stage you can mask if you have not sewn 100% straight. I think this make the seam allowances look cleaner especially if you have a fabric that is prone to fraying.

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Then I cast the seam allowances down, I use a filler thread because it is pretty and it keep the edge from fraying. To be honest the use of filler threads like this is something that might not be 100% historically accurate, the use of filler threads have been found on the garments from Greenland, but the findings is from the necklines only. But I do this anyway, as I find it historically plausible and pretty, but I wanted to make clear that it might not be correct.

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But it is so pretty!

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Take care when casting down the seam allowances to not go through the shell fabric, as I have done here, red might not have been the best choice of colour.

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I do the same on the shoulder seams.

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Then I cut out the fabric for my guards. The width is you choice, there are a lot of variation in the pictures, but they are all fairly wide. I have also added 1cm seam allowance on both sides.
I cut them longer then I really need, to have some fabric to work with.

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I press in the seam allowance on one side.

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Then put the guard right sides together with the front opening, make sure that you the guard is sticking out in the top and bottom.

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Mark the top of.

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Then put the strip from the bottom of the neckline in the front.

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Mark the corners on both strips.

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Draw diagonal lines on both strips connecting one corner to another.

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That line is the seam line, I add 0,5cm seam allowance.

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I always number my pieces to make sure that I know where they are supposed to go.

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Then I keep doing the same thing for the whole neckline. Putting the strips right sides to the bodice, marking the corners, drawing seam lines and adding seam allowance.

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Do this for the whole neckline and front openings.

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I sew them together in the right order using running stitches and silk thread, the reason for not using back stitches is that these go faster and on this seam there will be no stress so the strength if the back stitch is not needed. It is important to use the seams wisely. You are hand sewing this thing so why waste time by using a stitch that is unnecessary, time that can be better used doing other nice things.

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I sew only to the pressed fold of the seam allowance, not all the way down.

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In some of the corners you need to make some cuts and to cut away some material to make the guards lay flat when you press the seams down.

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When the seams of the guard is pressed you put it right side to the lining of the bodice.

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I have marked out my seam allowance on the neckline and centre front; 1cm with a tailors chalk.

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Then I sew the guards to the bodice using running stitches with waxed linen thread, make smaller stitches or even back stitches in the corners.

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Then I trim down the corners to make them less bulky.

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I take away the basing thread in the neckline.

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I also cut away like this, to make it possible to turn the guards and make the corners nice and neat.

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I trim down the seam allowances all around the front and neckline. The shell fabric is shortest, the guards are longest and the lining is in between.

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Turn the guards around and press the edges, make sure that the black is visible from the lining side, this is to make sure that the lining fabric will not peak over the edge when the dress is worn.

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Pin the guards down.

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Now we take a break from the bodice and make lacing strips. They are made from the same linen as the lining, folded so that you fold the raw edges inside so that the whole strip have four layers of fabric. As you can see the lacing holes are for spiral lacing, that is the most common lacing type in the 16th century.

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I sew a line of running stitches on one side of where I want my boning.

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Then I make my lacing holes, the next pictures are taken from another project, as I forgot to take pictures. I start of by punching holes in the fabric with the smallest setting. I sew them with button hole stitch, as this is a period correct way to do both buttonholes and lacing holes. The knots on the buttonhole stitch makes the lacing holes and button holes more even and it protect the edge. Each stitch is a knot and that means that when the buttonhole or lacing hole gets a lot of wear so that it actually wears of threads the rest of the buttonhole will be intact. If you don’t have the knots the entire buttonhole might unravel.

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Then I widen the holes using my bone tool, I know a lot of people use knitting needles for this work, I made this bone tool to polish the edges of punched holes in leather, but it is perfect for making lacing holes as well.

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Make a hole as big as you want.

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Thread a needle with waxed linen tread and make a knot at the end. I put the needle in a bit away from the hole and come up about 4mm from it.

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Pull the thread through.

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Put the needle through the hole and up through the fabric again, at the same distance from the hole as last time.

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As you pull the tread you will see the loop that is forming.

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Put the tread on the left side of the loop, and then take the needle through the loop from behind. It is important that you put the tread on the left and come through from behind, this is what makes the knot on the thread.

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Pull the tread, see in what direction I am pulling the tread, this makes the knot end up at the edge of the hole. You can pull it so that it comes more up on the edge or even more inside the hole depending on how you pull the thread. It is a matter of taste where you place the knot.

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Do the same again and you will see that row of knots form like a pearl bracelet!

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After some stitches I like to use my bone tool again, when you sew lacing holes it tends to shrink as you work. Doing this makes the hole bigger, you can get a lot more stitches in and the lacing hole itself gets stiff from all the stitches, no need to reinforce with metal rings at all.

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Then you keep stitching until you come all the way round to your first stitch.

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Here I go through the treads between the first and the second knot.

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And then down to the backside. Doing this will make sure that there is a solid ring without gaps.

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I secure the thread on the backside.

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Take the needle through the layers and then up again.This is so that the end of the tread will not be visible. And if you cut the tread of just where you secured it the knot will unravel, having a cm of thread left will keep the knot secure.

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Cut the knot of on the front and the tread of the back.

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And then you do it all over again, and again and again.

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Then I pin the lacing strip to the bodice about 0,5 cm from the centre front edge.

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Then I attach the lacing stitch with backstitches, through all the layers except the guards. This line of stitches forms the boning channel.

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See how clever it is, the seam is totally hidden by the guards.

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Here is where I stray from period correctness, I use a modern crinoline steel to help my lacing out. I guess the period correct version would be to use reed as you use in 18th century stays.

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I secure the top and bottom with extra tiny stitches.

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Now I sew the guards down, I sew with silk thread and with these stitches that makes the seam invisible.

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Then I trim of the end of the lacing strip.

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I trim some of the lining of to make sure that it won’t peak out when the bodice is hemmed.

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Then I fold 1,5 cm up and press the hem, I trim some off just at my lacing panel.

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Then I sewing it the hem down with small stitches.

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Then I pull away the basting thread at the hem.

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All clean and pretty, but not done yet! My floor is not so clean ;) I have the habit of throwing scraps and treads on the floor, it is quicker for me that way, to clean it all in one go.

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This is how it looks so far.

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Now lace it up with a scrap string.

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Put needles in between the lacing, this is to prevent the lacing from gaping.

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Secure with stitches.

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Now on to sleeves, this tutorial comes with a pattern of a simple s-sleeve but here you can see my fancy sleeve that is a adapted version of the s-sleeve.

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I sew the sleeve together using back stitches, and then I sew it into the bodice also using back stitches.
The sleeve head have added 3 cm of ease, the sleeve is 3 to big for the bodice arm holes. This is to make a pretty sleeve and those 3 cm is distributed at the top of the sleeve around the shoulder seam. It is not supposed to be a puffy sleeve, done correctly you will have no small pleats or ruffles in the seam. for wool 3 cm of ease is not that much is you sew in linen it will be harder to fit the sleeve.

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Here you see the ease, but where the seam is there is no pleats or ruffles. To make a pretty sleeve this ease must be pressed down.

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I put it on my tailors ham and add water.

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then I gently start to work the ease down. You will have to go easy to not press the ease into pleats. Add more water when you fell that is is dry and press until flat.

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Here we see before and after, insane difference, this is why wool is awesome!

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Now I trim down my seam allowance in the sleeves to 1 cm.

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Then I cast the edges of all the layers together, this is all the finishing I will do on this edge, binding it would make it to bulky, but this is enough to keep it nice and together.
Remove all the basting threads left on the bodice.

Now on to the skirt, unfortunately when I took the photos I decided not to show you how to attach the skirt as I wore it as a separate piece. But is is much more period correct to have the skirt and bodice sewn together so when I decided to renovate my 16th century German dress and attach the skirt I took photos of that. But that means that I have no photos of how to sew the skirt part together.

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But it is very easy. My skirt is made up by three widths of fabric sewn together with running stitches and then the seams are felled. In one seam there is a opening so that you can get in and out of the dress.
I choose three widths of fabric to make it wide enough in relation to my body. I am big, and to make the hem look on me as it does on the women in the woodcuts, to make the pleats as deep ad they need to be I needed three widths of fabric. If you are smaller you will do fine with less and it personal preference. I already have a good trossfrau body, round hips, small waist and big breast but I you need more hips the extra fabric will help you out. I like to joke and say I was built to for 16th century German fashion ;)

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I have quite the wide hem on the skirt, this helps to hold it out in shape.

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The slit in front, here you can see my stitching before I started tailoring school, sooo big stitches ;)

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I have two rows of guards on the skirt, the cut-out is inspired by a woodcut, some people have puffs of silk coming out of these slashes, I wanted mine to be simple. I have also sewn down the slashes onto the skirt in stead of only hemming them. After a few incidents of getting stuck on low objects and benches and ripping the slashes or at some times part of the whole guard of the dress I decided to make it more secure.

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On the top of the skirt I fold down 3 cm. This is because I want to make the cartridge pleating in double fabric, to make the pleats even fuller.

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Using my smock guide I mark out two lines of dots that are 1 cm from each other and 1 cm from the edge.

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Like this

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Then I divide the skirt into four parts, this is to make gathering the skirt even easier, I make marks with some thread.

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Then I sew the gathering treads, down one dot up at the next.

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At the slit I sew the edges of the fold and the skirt together.

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I sew two lines of gathering stitches that I secure in one end.

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Then I pull the treads, look at the pretty cartridge pleating.

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I also mark the bodice in four equal parts.

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Then I put the markings at the skirt to the markings on the bodice right sides together.

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Now it is easy to gather the skirt evenly, put some pins as I go along.

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Then I stitch the skirt to the bodice. I do it with two stitches at each pleat, to make it strait.
Also the skirt is kind of heavy and these stitches need to be able to hold that weight.

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Look all neat and nice, I love cartridge pleats!

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This is how it looks at the front opening.

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When you are finished with the seam you can pull the gathering treads out.

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As you can see the cartridge pleats “stands open” inside the dress, this gives you the extra hip boost that will give you the correct 16th century hips, and for us that already have 16th century hips naturally; we get the superfrauhips! More hips is good, the German ladies all seems to have a lot of them.

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And now, you are actually DONE! With the dress that is, the list of stuff you need now is long, this is why the 16th century German women never gets boring. It is easy to give one dress many looks by simply changing the chemise, the veil or the size of you wulsthaube. Throwing on another hat, getting a fancy new gollar. I have tutorial for most of the details to make a 16th century German outfit in my tutorial list

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Here is the pattern.
It is in cm as always and made for me.
Bust: 118cm
Waist: 94cm

Remember to do a mock-up before cutting into the real fabric.

16th century German dress - pattern front
16th century German dress - pattern back
16th century German dress - pattern sleeve

buttoned and lined liripipe

I thought that I would show you how I made my buttoned liripipe.

The pattern is a mix of Herjolfsnes no.72 from Greenland and hood no. 246 from the excavations in London. It is a tight hood but it can be worn both closed and open with the front part turned back.

I used a really nice thin grey wool for the outside fabric and a bright fun checked wool for the lining. I study tailoring and we made half a tailored jacket as a exercise and after everyone had cut out their jackets there was a lot of fabric over due to the fact that we pattern matched it. And most people just threw the pieces away since they were pretty small and they thought it was kind of ugly.
So I sneaked around and pulled their pieces out of the bins, free fabric is love.
The colours fit into the medieval colour spectra with a madder red and the other colours are also possible to achieve with plant dyes. So I pieces the scraps together, I know that pattern matching is not that period but I could not help myself, I just love pattern matching.
I sew with waxed linen thread and with sewing thread depending on what I am sewing.

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I start with cutting the shell fabric out. I have a pieced liripipe to save fabric so I take my big piece and put it on the lining with the wrong sides together.

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Then I baste the two layers together. Making sure that I do not baste to close to the edge at the slits for the shoulder gore.

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Then I cut the hood out of the lining fabric. Doing it this way in stead of cutting them separately is that there is no need to match them later, they are identical right from the start.

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Cut the slits for the shoulder gore in the lining fabric to.

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We are going to start with putting the shoulder gores in. We will sew them in from the right side. It is a easy way to set gores without having to worry about the tip being all wonky.
With a chalk I draw the sewing allowance on the gore. I have 1cm

Sewing the gores in from the right side is a technique that have been found on the garments from Greenland.

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The cut slits in the hood have now sewing allowance so put the cut edge to the chalk line.

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You should put the gore in between the lining layer and the shell fabric.
This is why you should not baste to close to the edge.

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Pin it in place.

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Fold the edge of the slit in.

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Do this all the way around the slit, see how easy it is to make a pretty tip on the gusset.

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Make sure that you only pin the shell fabrics layers together.

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Then sew the gusset with this kind of stitch.

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Make sure that you only sew the shell fabric together.

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And there is your gusset.

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This is the backside. The line is there to help me to pattern match the lining gusset.

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Do the same thing with the lining gusset. Yes, there might have been some non period pattern matching going on here to, but there is a lot of piecing and that is totally period

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Then you attach the liripipe the same way, from the right side. I do this because I am lazy and that it gives you a nice flat seam from the beginning. And the seam will not get any wear so it will hold anyway.

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I do not line the liripipe, no one will see it anyway and it will just be bulky.

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I cut the seam allowance down a bit, to reduce the bulk even more.

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Then I sew down the seam allowance. I use filler threads to keep the edges from fraying, and it looks pretty as well. This is a technique that have been found in the garments from Greenland.

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Then I mark out the centre front of the hood. On the buttonhole side I want it to overlap with 0,5 cm so I mark that out to.

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I baste the centre front line on the button hole side to make it easy for myself when I am going to mark out the button holes later on.

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On the side were the buttons will be attached I fold in the seam allowance completely, since you want the buttons to be attached to the edge of the hood at the centre front.
I cut some notches in the seam allowance to make it possible to press.
On the side where you want the button holes you only press in 0,5cm since you want it to overlap a bit.

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I trim down the seam allowance where the notches are so that the notches are cut of, It looks prettier.

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Then I trim away the lining a bit, to make it smoother.

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Cast down the edge with filler thread.

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Like this.

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Finish of both sides the same way.

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Then you sew the buttonholes. I use a silk buttonhole thread to work mine, It gives the best results and have been found on the garments described in Textiles and clothing.
I wait with the buttons since I always sew the buttons on last. It is a tailor habit and comes from the fact that you can not do a proper last press on a garment if the buttons are on it.

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Not it is time to sew the neck seam. I mark out where I want to sew.

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I start at the liripipe. Here I sew with short running stitches. There is no stress on these seams and sewing a back stitch is just wasting time.

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I sew with short running stitches all the way to this point in the neck, this is where I start sewing with back stitches.

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Then I press the seams apart.

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Period seam allowances are narrow so I try to simulate that with cutting my seam allowances down a bit.

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As I have done with all my other seams, I use the filler threads when I cast the edges down.

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Now it is time to hem the hood. I have chosen to tablet weave around the hood.
If you want to know how to do it, I explained this in my tutorial on how to make a open hood.
Click here to go to it.

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Now we make the buttons. Mark out the size on a piece of fabric.

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Using a strong thread (I use waxed linen) sew running stitches around the circle.

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Then I trim the edges. If you have a big button you can leave these on to use for filling of the button. But my button is small so I cut it away.

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I gather the the button around my thumb.

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Fold the edges inside.

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Make a single knot and pull it together.

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Then I massage it between my fingers. I find that this makes a better shape and also enables you to pull it even tighter.

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Pull it tighter and make the second knot.

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And then you have a button small round and tight.

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Using the left over threads I sew them right onto the edge. Make sure that they have a bit of a neck or else they will be hard to button.

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Now it is time to take away all the basting and to press your hood well. The tailor in me hates unpressed seams, everything is better well pressed.

And then it is done! Worn here with my modern clothes and my Bigritta cap.
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And of course the pattern. In cm per usual.
liripipe pattern

leather costrel

Last medieval week I ran around with a plastic bottle in my bag, since drinking water is important but plastic bottles are not all that fun I decided to make a leather bottle in stead.

Looking around there is two options, the bottle looking kind and the one that looks like a small barrel. As I do both medieval and 16 century stuff I wanted a bottle that I could use for both. Leather costrels seems to have been around forever, a quick google search found me both museum pictures of costrels from the late 1300 and from 1500 and they were in use at least up until the 18th century.

I also found a picture of huntsmen with costrels.

So I decided on a costrel, I like the idea that it could easily be made so that it would stand on its on to. I looked around at different techniques, some people use wooden moulds but I don’t want to bother with mould making so I went with the sand version. Haandkrafts beautiful costrel gave me lots of help figuring out how to actually make one.
I chose to take away some of the layers that he used, and it worked fine anyway.

leather costrel - pattern
Here is the pattern for it, it is in cm and I made one difference from my original costrel, it is only that the outer seam allowance is 0,5cm in stead of 1cm on the sides. There is no difference in function only the look. You need to use vegetable tanned leather for this project. Chrome tanned leather is never healthy, especially not if you use it for storing water that you want to drink. I worked with 3mm thick leather and found that it was perfect thickness for me. This costrel holds 9 dl of water or any other liquid.

leather costrel 1
leather costrel 2
Using an awl I made all the holes for the main part. I do not make any holes in the sides, they will be made as we go along with the sewing. Make sure that the holes in the top part matches, count them and make sure, you are sewing these together so they need to be the same amount and at the same places.

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I have also prepared for the decoration, using a knife I have cut the decoration into the leather, but only 1mm deep. Mu decoration is based on this costrel but with my initials on it.

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I started with sewing to top together, I use blunt needles and waxed flax thread.

leather costrel 5
leather costrel 6
Making it look like a small leather tent.

leather costrel 7
leather costrel 8
leather costrel 9
Take one side piece and wet the edges shape it with your hands, you might want to take some of the corners of, but don not cut away to much, it might cause the corstel to leak.

leather costrel 10
I have marked out where the top and bottom are supposed to be, so put the side piece into the “tent”. As I have not made any holes in the side piece, you will need to make these as you go along. Just put your awl in one of the holes in the main bottle piece and push it through the side piece as well, but watch your fingers.

leather costrel 11
I start in the centre bottom, with the seam that is farthest from the edge. I sew it from the middle to the top on both sides. I don’t knot any threads, I fasten them by making them overlap by three stitches.

leather costrel 12
I try to not end in the centre top, it is tricky to sew there anyway so I fasten the seams by overlapping a bit down on the sides as you can see it you look closely on this picture.
Sew the other seam, closest to the edge and sew the other side on. It is important to have two seams , it will make you costrel less prone to leaking.

Cut out holes for carrying straps.

Now submerge your half finished costrel in lukewarm water and let it stay there for at least some hours. Then you can force the leather to make the opening, my pattern will give you a opening that is just so wide that you can use a cut of plastic bottle as a funnel. It is also a width of opening that we are all used to. The water will come out just as well as from a ordinary water bottle.

Now you stuff it full of sand. Pour first dry sand into it. When it is full, add some water. Then you continue to stuff it with sand until it can not take no more and feels solid.

leather costrel 13
leather costrel 14
leather costrel 15
leather costrel 16
Now you can make the pattern if you want to, you will feel if the leather is to wet, then the pattern will not be as distinct. If this is the case, wait a day or so and try again.
I use a modelling tool for leather but you don’t really need any special tools, use what you have around you, a nice rounded stick, a fork to make a pattern with.
I don’t have any leather stamps so I used a edge cutter to make the dotted pattern.

leather costrel 17
One side done, one to go!

Now let your costrel sit and dry, this might take some time. I put mine in a sunny window and it helps to pour out sand as you go along.

When it is completely dry and all the sand is removed it is time to pour wax into it.
I used beeswax. Melt it carefully, get a old sauce pan from the thrift shop since the pan you use will forever be your bees wax pan.
Pour the warm wax into the bottle (wax is WARM so use caution) you should fill it at least until it is half full. Put a cork into it and move the wax around and make sure to cover all of the inside, it is easy to miss so make sure that the ceiling of the costrel is covered.
When you have done this you can pour the wax out again, pour small amounts into moulds made of of old plastic cups and you will have sewing wax for later. and it is easier to melt if you need more wax some other time.

Some fill the bottle completely with wax and put it in the oven on low heat, then they remove it when they see the wax seeping through on the outside of the bottle.

Now you can test your bottle by simply pouring water into it. You will quickly see if you need to redo the waxing part.
leather costrel 18
leather costrel 19
I coloured my costrel with modern leather dye. and this is how it turned out.
I added a carrying straps to be able to put it on my belt. I also carried it a lot as a small silly handbag ;)

leather costrel 20
leather costrel 21
A kind of a toggle lock, for quick removal from the belt.

leather costrel 23
leather costrel 22
A wooden cork attached with a thinner leather string.

It was SO useful to be able to carry around water with me the whole week without any problems, just remember to store it without the cork in to prevent it from moulding.
The first day of use the water tasted very much of honey, it might had been nice it if the water had been something else then sun warm ;)

16th century German – steuchlein

As I am in the progress of making a new shirt to my 16th century German dress, I also needed a new steuchlein to wear over my wulsthaube since my old one is in raw silk just as my old shirt. And here is how I make my steuchlein complete with a pattern diagram.

steuchlein - pattern
So here is my pattern, I put the long side against the fold of the fabric and that is also the reason that my steuchlein is 150 cm long. I use the width of the fabric. In the end it is mostly like a liripipe pattern, but without the cape part.

steuchlein - cut and ready
I use a thin linen fabric from medeltidsmode.se and sew with silk thread, because I like it and I find that the linen thread I have is a bit to thick for this fabric.

steuchlein - end on tail
Start with hemming the end of the end of the tail, I cut my selvage away here, since I do not think it is that pretty and hemming with that gets so bulky. If you have nice selvage you can just ignore the hemming part and use the selvage as it is instead.

steuchlein - small running stithces
Then I sew the long seam that forms the tail part. I sew with small running stitches, using backstitch here is in my eyes just a waste of time since there is not any strain on this seam. Running stitches will work just as good.

steuchlein - scraping seams
Then I scrape the seams so that they lie flat. This is a period way of getting your seams smooth without ironing them. This is a bone tool that I use when I work with leather, but you can use whatever you like tree, bone your fingernails. I use my fingernails when I scrape my hems.

steuchlein - at tail
In the end of the tail, I fold in the raw edges and sew a bit. So that no loose threads will poke out.

steuchlein - felled seams to here
steuchlein - felled seams
Then I fell the seams. Not all the way since most of the seam allowances is in the tail part so that felling those would be a waste of time since they do not get any wear or is ever seen. The fabric is also cut slightly on bias here, so the edges will not really fray here anyway.

steuchlein - hem at bottom
Then I hem the bottom part. As you can see here, when working in linen fabric I like to pull out threads to know where my fold lines are. This ensures that the edges are 100% on straight grain.

steuchlein - double folded hem
My hems are double folded and when finished 0,5 cm wide, thin and nice.

steuchlein - pulling threads
Then it is time to hem the front of the steuchlein, I pull threads here as well, to know where to fold. I am going to hem it with a embroidery stitch, so I pull two more threads out to guide my stitches.

steuchlein - at face
Fold the front in, scrape the edge to make it flat.

steuchlein - hem at face
Here I have a single fold hem, using the selvage. Since it will not be seen and helps holding the front together. If you want to you can just hem it as it is now and then you are done.

steuchlein - herringbone stitch 1
steuchlein - herringbone stitch 2
steuchlein - herringbone stitch 3
steuchlein - herringbone stitch 4
steuchlein - herringbone stitch 5
But as my new shirt is with black embroidery I want to use the same thread on my steuchlein as well. So I decided to hem with a herringbone stitch.
So here are some pictures to explain the stitches. I sew with a thread that is slightly waxed to make it easy to sew with.
Here you can understand how it helps to pull out those threads. The embroidery is the exactly the same height all over.

steuchlein - herringbone stitch at back
On the back it looks like this.

steuchlein - hemmed front
I made a star it the centre front, to make it easier to put on right.

steuchlein - finished
steuchlein -  detail
And then you are done!

steuchlein - different ways
With this steuchlein you can make a lot of different styles very easy.

16th century German – gollar

It was ages ago that I made a tutorial for something and I had this one kind of laying around (in the paper version) so I thought that I should make it into a pretty Illustrator picture and upload it here with pictures of my own gollar that I made for this summer.

gollar - front open

My gollar is made out of wool and lined with rabbit fur and can be worn both with the collar down and the collar standing, it is closed with three hooks and eyes in the front.
As it is hard to take photos of your own back I bribed my sister to act as a model, she is much smaller then me so it looks a bit big on her.
gollar - front
gollar - side
gollar - back
gollar - detail
gollar - gusset detail
gollar - side open
gollar - back

Here are some inspirational pictures
Martin Schaffner 1533
gollar inspiration
gollar inspiration 2
Hans Holbein the Younger 1523
gollar inspiration 3

And finally the pattern, the measurements are in cm NOT in inches, click for bigger picture. The pattern is based on the drawings and not any extant gollar and to make make this pattern more historically correct you could choose to not have the gore in the back.
I have been made aware that the original pattern have some things that are faulty, I have now added a new pattern here where the changes are made in red. It is that the cut for the gore in the back should be 13,5 cm long, not 13 as it said before as the gore when drafted is 13,5cm long.
Also the shoulder seam on the front pattern piece is to short. Elongate as the picture shows with 2,5 cm and redraw the curve of the collar.
Sorry for any inconvenience, this was my fist pattern and I did not check the seams before posting.

gollar - pattern front NEW
gollar - pattern back NEW

As usual a toile is a good idea to make sure of the fit before you cut into fancy fabric. Good luck and happy sewing!. THae

underbust pattern teaser

corset pattern scribblings
It is on the roll, it really is! I have written all the things and taken pictures so all I have to do is fix the pictures up and make the text computer written and in English (I made it in Swedish since I am going to have both languages on it this time).

I also need to make a mockup so that I see that my corset drafting tutorial actually works ;)
But stay tuned, underbust corset pattern drafting tutorial is in the making!

corset pattern
This tutorial will allow you to make your own personalized pattern, made from your own measurements and starting with a totally blank paper making the corset fit you like a glove, a very tight, nice and perfect glove.
It is based on my own pattern pieces layout without a side seam which I believe makes nicer shape and the corset reduces mostly in the sides and in the back, making a really straight front corset with flat belly.
But it is all explained in a way that is allowing you to decide were to put your seams if you don’t want them were I put mine.