16th century German unbleached long smocked shirt

When I made my new plant dyed 16th century German dress I knew that I would need to make a new smocked shirt as the old one was so fancy.


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So I decided on a medium weight unbleached linen fabric.
This time I decided to make the shirt longer then the last time and also make it less wide.

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The shirt is sewn just as my last smocked German shirt, but with the addition of two gores, one in each of the side seams.
But other then that one can follow the assembly instructions of the white smocked shirt to the letter.
They can be found HERE

The good thing with this version is that there is not that much fabric in the collar, so you will save time on marking out dots, and also, the smocking is a bit different here, more suitable for the English smocking.

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It is lined in the neck with the same linen fabric, and closes with two small brass hooks on one side and two thread loops on the other side.

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Here you can see the smocking on the collar, done in a unbleached linen thread, making it nice, neat and subtle.

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The width of the sleeves are gathered in the bottom with a simple honeycomb smock.

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It is very nice and subtle, here it is worn under the underdress.
You can also see the new steuchlein I made to match the new smocked shirt.

Here is the pattern As always it is made for me and it is in cm.
So when using this, please make a mock up and check it against your own measurements.

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resetting smock

After spending lots of hours of smocking, you wear your fancy new smocked garment on a event, afterwards you throw it in the washing machine.

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And it comes out looking all wonky and not at all that crisp and nice.
But there is no need to worry, resetting is easy, it just takes some time if you only have a ordinary ironing board.

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You need lots of pins for this, star of by pinning on the edge.

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Pin at every stitch for as long as your ironing board or garment allows.

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Then you pull the fabric under each stitch, see, now you can see the crispness again, and then you put a pin.

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Lots of pins, you need to have these without heads, as we are going to apply heat to them later on.

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If you do not have a iron with steam, you take a piece of fabric, I use a linen kitchen towel and make it really wet in one end, Use a old washed fabric to prevent excess colour from staining your work. Squeeze out some of the water.

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Lay the wet part of the towel over the smock.

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Then really lightly touch the towel with the iron just where your smock is. Do not apply any pressure, you only want the heat. The towel should now do a sizzling noise, the water turning into steam. If you happen to have a steam iron, you can just use a dry towel and then hold it over the towel and use lots of steam on the smock.

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Now take the towel away and wait for it to cool down and dry completely. If you have a vacuum ironing board this takes you no time, but for us without it can take several hours.

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I do the sleeve on the sleeve board.

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And this is how it turn out after cooling down, as good as new or perhaps even crisper. Now you can move on the the newt part of your garment and work your way around the whole smock, just to the same thing all over again.

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Here is a smocked apron that I have done the same thing to.

And now you can go out, wear it at en event, throw it in the washing machine and then do it all again ;)