Medieval textile belt purse

This type of textile bag with tassels can be found in manuscripts and pictures from the middle of the 13th century to the middle of the 16th century. This is the type of bag that women wore hanging from their belts in long ribbons and it was very often hidden by the over dress.

The look of the bag varies greatly, different kind and amount of tassels, colours and fabrics. The material of the edging and the materials in edging and tassels.

This bag I will show you is based on the simple three stranded flat braid. The look is very similar to the tablet woven edge but much simpler as you do not have to know card weaving to do it. Here is a extant bag with a similar braided edge.

The material of your bag decides how “fine” your bag is and it is possible to make the same kind of bag in silk and in wool, also embroidered bags can be found in the extant findings.

Start by cutting your fabric, I use a wool fabric for the outside that is 19,5*35,5 cm (7,7 * 14 inches) and the lining is a thin linen fabric that is 19,5 * 34,5 cm (7,7 * 13,6) note that the lining is shorter then the outside fabric, it should be so that the lining does not peak out at the top when finished. Seam allowances are included.

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Pin both the short sides, with the outside fabric and lining right sides together and sew them with a small running stitch with 1cm (0,4 inch) seam allowance.

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Press both seams open like this, you now have a tube of fabric. As you can see I have marked on both sides around the tube, 2cm (0,8 inch) from the edge.

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Now you want to press in the 1cm (0,4 inch) seam allowance on both sides around the tube. This is very easily done as you can simply fold the edge until the raw edge meets the 2cm (0,8 inch) markings, what you now have folded in and pressed is your 1cm (0,4 inch) seam allowance.

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Turn your fabric tube inside-out and put the wrong sides together, pressing the short sides flat and nice.

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Now it is time for the braiding. First you need to cut all the yarn you need, how much depend on the thickness of yam you are using. I use a medium/thin wool yarn. You will do two braids, one longer and one shorter. For my long I have 18 threads that are 2m (2.2yd) long. To my short braid I use 9 threads that are 1,5m (1,6yd) long.

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On one end, make a knot so that you have loops in the end.

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Cut the other side open.

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I use a door handle like this when I braid, to have something to braid against.

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You are going to make a simple three strand braid so part your yarn into three equal strands. As you can see you always strive to put the outer threads in the middle. And as you move the outer threads to the inside the threads that where on the inside ends up on the outside. Like this a braid is formed, yes trying to use words to describe braiding is really hard, that is why I made this neat illustration of how you do it!

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Start with the long 2m (2,2yd) threads and keep on braiding, as you braid the bottom will become tangled. So now and then make sure that the bottom is untangled, or you are going to have a mess of yarn in the end and a short short braid.

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Braid the 2m (2,2yd) long threads until your braid measures 1,2m (1,3 yd)(measure when relaxed) and make a knot.

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Trim the end roughly, the rest of the threads will be used for the tassels so save them.

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Now take the shorter treads and do the same thing, knot in the end, cut the other side open, divide in three and braid. But this time you braid the full length of the threads.

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Then cut the braid in half, unravel the ends a bit for tassels and make knots. there you have the two drawstrings for your purse.

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Now we make the tassels, cut a piece of yarn and tie it around the middle of one of the leftover ends from the long braid folded in half.

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Make a knot and pull the knot to the top of the tassel, so that you get this look.

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Make all three tassels, don’t trim the ends yet.

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Now we are back at the sewing, mark two lines at both the short edges, one that is 1 cm (0,4 inch) from the edge and then one that is 1,5cm (0,6 inch) from the first line.

NOTE

I got a question on what I was basing this type of drawstring on, an the simple and honest answer is that I did not look at the extant purses. I simply looked at manuscript pictures and did what felt right and what worked.
What I have found is two bags with the same type of drawstring, but the first a 10th century German relic bag is way out of my time span and the second one is also a German bag but from 1540 so it is a bit on he late side.
This was a stupid thing of me to do, because when I looked and asked around all the extant purses have simply the drawstring pulled trough the outer fabric and lining, no holes made and no eyelets sewn.

Like these extant purses show you.
14th century Sion
Mid 14th century France
1301-1400 Europe Here you can also see what looks like a linen lining.

But one should note that the extant purses have silk cords, and the shell fabric is almost always silk embroidered linen. For a purse like mine with wool strings and wool outer fabric I would suggest that one did sewn eyelets either with linen or silk thread to prolong the life of the drawstring and bag itself.

If you wish to do eyelets instead I would suggest to to them in two levels as this picture shows, as the braided wool cords are a bit on the thick side, or to do your braids a bit thinner. If you do eyelets you can also skip the part about skipping over the tunnel for the drawstring that will come further down, just sew the braid to the bag all the way to the top in stead.

END OF NOTE

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Stitch along the lines with small running stitches.

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Like this, on both short sides.

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Fold the bag in half, lining against lining. Short sides against short sides and pin along the edges.

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Take a longer piece of yarn and thread it on a needle. Knot the end of the yarn and starting from the inside of the bag, between the lining and outer fabric, pull the tread trough.

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We are now going to attach the long braid, that also is your carrying strap at the same time as we sew together the lining and outside fabric. Pull the needle right trough your braid like this.

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Make sure to catch both the lining and outer layers. Go straight trough the braid, and take a stitch right trough the bag, angle it slightly upward to the other side and pull the tread trough as far away from the first stitch as you choose.

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Sew like this along the length of the bag, stopping only at the channel for the drawstring that you stitched before, there go trough the layers. Then when you have passed the channel continue your sewing until you reach the top edge, there fasten the treads.
Do the exact same thing on the other side of the bag, before sewing the braid make sure that it is not twisted.

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Divide the bottom part of the bag in three and attach the tassels.

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Take one of your short braids and tread it trough one side of the channel with the help of a safety pin, go under the big braid and thread the braid trough the other channel as well.

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Like this!

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To the same thing with the other braid as well. Now you have a functional drawstring!

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Pull the bag shut and then trim the tassels all around. I like it when my tassels are bigger in the middle and gradually gets shorter to the sides, but that is just personal preference.

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Now it is done! Put it on your belt and feel happy! I have mine hanging from a purse hanger that I got at Historiska Fynd.

18th century common woman

I got invited to a 18th century event with the question “I’m sure you have some 18th century clothing”, my answer was “No actually not, but the event is one month away and I am sure that I can make something”.

I have liked the 18th century for years, started a outfit years ago but it never got any further then a par of stays, a chemise, a pocket, bumroll and a half finished jacket. So it was not really a hard thing to start up with again. Last time I wanted the big silk dress, but now I had acquired the taste for lower class. The “undressed” is so nice, very forgiveable and a god place to start. It can easily be made on a budget as you can wear miss matched skirts and jackets; perfect for thrift shop fabrics.

I asked for a Swedish 18th century artist to Google and was told that Per Hilleström was the way to go and I quickly decided on this picture.  He paints a good amount of more common Swedish people an around a time that I like. The picture of the women and the fish is dated to 1775, a period that I like shape wise and I really like the shape of her jacket, simple but nice.

I looked around some more and added my findings to a album on my pinterest .

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My old stays was way to small, so I made a new one. The pattern is the 1776 stays from “Corsets and crinolines” by Norah Waugh. I decide to not hand stitch the stays as I had only a month for this project. So therefore I choose to use coutil for the base fabric and also steel boning, I will make a more correct one when I have the time for it. The top fabric is a old linen table cloth that was mangled into shine by some old lady making it look almost silk like, I thrifted it for almost no money at all.

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I choose to sew the middle section by hand, if it decided to peek out under by bows or if I needed to undo the jacket for some reason, faking it until you make it.

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The stays are bound with red wool, leftover from my medieval hose making. Wool is a very nice material to bind with as it can be steamed and pressed flat after binding and have some natural stretch even if I actually did cut it on bias as well. when binding tabs, you want all the help you can get. The binding was machine stitched thee first way around and then stitched down on the back by hand. Making it very neat and nice on the outside.
I choose to make the lacing holes by hand, I as I am crazy and actually love button hole stitching I stitched them with button hole silk thread from Gütermann.

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I really like the finished result of the stays, they are nice to wear and does no compress anything, as stays are not made for tight lacing but to only give the correct shape, something that my soft body very easily does. I would say that stays are on the hole more comfortable to wear then other types of corsets, as there are no reduction. The measurements of my waist and bust of me in stays and without are the same, or to be honest my waist is slightly bigger in the stays. But the tabs makes by hips look even more huge then they are, perfect for the 18th century silhouette.

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In the pictures of me in my stays, you can see my old hand stitched chemise, I used it almost as it was, but I added a small ruffle of a finer linen around the neckline, inspired by this extant chemise. I also swapped the green string in the drawstring neckline into a pink faux silk taffeta ribbon.

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My next dilemma was the shoes, I had no budget at all to buy finished shoes and I had no shoes at home that might work. SO I turned to my local second hand shops. I wear a size 42 (US size 11) and had no real hopes about finding shoes, my local second hand shops are not that good. So I was very surprised to actually find a pair of never worn size 41 shoes in real leather and with a heel that might actually pass as nearly right for under 10 USD. They were a bit frumpy and in a boring colour, but I instantly knew that I could make these work. And we have a shoe stretcher at work, so that they were one size to small was not an issue.

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I did some creative cutting, gluing, and then binding it all with a thin leather I had at home already, adding a tongue and buckles made out of other buckles. To make it all into one shoe again, I slapped some black leather paint on them and; Tada! Passable as 18th century shoes! The stockings I bought from American Duchess ages ago, I was very happy that I had them just laying around.

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Next up was the jacket. I already decided that I wanted a 1770:ish jacket with bows in the front. So I turned to the very good book called “Kvinnligt mode under två sekel” by Britta Hammar and Pernilla Rasmussen.” (Female fashion over two centuries). A very in depth book using Swedish extant garments, looking at everything from the fabrics to the way the sleeves were set and the seems where sewn.
I choose a silk jacket in the book for the simplicity of the cut, and the short sleeves and bows as in the painting that I was inspired by. Using my stays pattern a base I made the pattern for the jacket looking at pictures of the pattern for the silk jacket. I made two toilles to make sure that the shape was right, the gores put in at the right height and the skirt of the jacket wide enough. Also testing the sleeves and length.

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The fabric for the jacket is a brown wool that I found at a thrift shop for around two USD and the lining as a end of the bolt fine natural linen with sun bleached edges that I got for five USD at a fabric shop. Both in very nice qualities. The jacket was hand stitched together and fully lined of course. I got brown silk ribbon of ebay to put in the front and the sleeve ruffles are made in thin linen fabric.
I wanted t have the not so fancy embroidered sleeve ruffles, as also can be found in both pictures and extant examples. For one, I do not embroider that well, I did not have the time and also, I wanted to keep it simple. I wanted to keep the silk ribbons and silk socking the most fancy thing in this outfit.

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I knew I needed something on my head, and I opted for the small linen cap with ruffles or lace edges, the ribbon in the back was inspired by this painting also by Hilleström. Still keeping it simple without lace but adding a matching ribbon.

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One of the other things I already had was the embroidered pocket, inspired by extant pockets of forest and deer but with a very modern twist. I made this for several years ago and it is actually taken from a mug made by my all time favourite designer Klaus Haapaniemi. The mug was part of the summer collection Satumetsä he made for the Finnish company Iittala that I adore. The pocket is made in linen with linen embroidery, so not very historically accurate.

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I also had a bum roll, but it was quite big so I deflated it a bit by opening it up and removing more then half the stuffing. I already have so mush hips, and for a common persons outfit you don’t need that much oopmf in the back. But as the stays gave me superhips I looked almost flat in the back and it looked kind of off, so the bum roll only took the sharp edge of the flatness.

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The fabric for the skirt is the only fabric that I bought specificity for this outfit, it is a woad blue wool from my favourite shop “Medeltidsmode”. I made the skirt the “apron way”, with the back part tying in the front and the front tying in the back, giving you natural pockets slits in the sides. In many of the skirts from the book “Kvinnligt mode under två sekel” the front part had a wider waistband then the back so I made my skirt according to this fashion as well, it is very simply pleated to the waistband.

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I am very pleased with my outfit, but the only thing that I am no all that happy with is my bangs, They are to short for me to try and hide in a hairdo so I simply left them out this time, perhaps I need to get myself a good wig in stead so I don’t have to bother with my hair, wigs are period correct after all.

Now follows a bunch of pictures I took by some 18th century cottages that are situated only a short walk from my apartment, I feel so spoiled to live in Sweden sometimes, we have so much history that is just around the corner from where we live.
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The event I attended was awesome, very cosy in a 18th century cabin in the woods in Stockholm, filled to the brim with nice people in awesome outfits. If you want to see pictures from the event, check out these facebook albums

The brown Greenland gown.

I started to feel like it was about time to sew a new dress, after three years (or tree weeks as I only really worn it to medieval week) in my green gown I had so many things I wanted to do better. I did my green gown before I started tailoring school and when I was really new on medieval stuff. I decided on brown last summer, but did not buy any fabric, and then the yellow gained on the “most wanted dress list” as it felt like “everyone” was doing brown. In the end I did a small poll on my personal facebook, and everyone said yellow… And a small voice in my head said but, but, the brown, is so pretty.

That is how you choose colours ;) so I bought a lovely oak brown thin twill from Handelsgillet a thin ans shiny fabric perfect for summer, a lot thinner then my green dress. I got it home and steamed it and put it on the “to do shelf”.

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Next of was pattern, I knew I wanted to do a Greenland inspired gown, so I looked a lot on Greenland no. 38 for this dress. I love the slim panels in the sides that flare into a wide skirt, it is perfect for fitting on a large bust and “hides” hips in the fullness of the skirt. I tried my hands on the 38 in my green gown, but now I wanted to master it with my tailoring skills.
I choose to make it much more fitted then the original gown, as the trendy tight fitting dresses from the manuscripts. I also choose to have buttons in the sleeves as you can see in the London findings. As I wanted to make this so that I can wear it as a middle dress I choose to make it with lacing in the front in stead of buttons, also this is inspired by period art, in the shape of the grave effigy of Katherine, Countess of Warwick. She sports lots of tiny buttons on her sleeves and then spiral lacing in the front.

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Also I did not know when I made the green dress but the panels of the original 38 is actually cut slightly on bias. I wanted to see what difference it makes. For one it makes the cutting of the dress very fabric effective. You get a lot out of your fabric with not all that much waste but a great fullness of the skirt.

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A big bust is troublesome when fitting and it took me about six toilles before I felt that the fit was nice, as always it is hard fitting yourself, but I am happy with how the pattern turned out. Keeping the side panels slim as in the original felt important, is would have been a lot easier it they had been wider and more of princess seams, but then it would not have been the same dress.

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I basted together the whole dress to check the fit, I want to show you my stitches. I find that many people baste very small, this is my stitches. I make them smaller in the tight fitting areas, and then really big in the skirts. Don’t waste time on small basting, do small stitches where it matters in stead.

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After the fitting I started to sew the real seams, I do it like this. A ribbon is tied around my leg just over my knee, and then the fabric of the dress is pinned to the ribbon. As I sew the fabric is tight and it makes for quicker sewing and easier to make straight seams. I sew with backstitches where the dress is tight, until my hips, and from there I sew with running stitches in stead, with the occasional backstitch. Again, don’t waste your time with backstitches on such a wide skirt, it is unnecessary and only takes time.

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After sewing all seams I pressed them really well and then I felled the seams to one side using a filler thread. The filler treads can be found in the seams just as this on the Greenland finds. I sew down the wool filler thread with sewing silk.

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Where the buttonholes and lacing holes are I have reinforced with a linen strip.

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I choose to sew my buttonholes with a real buttonhole stitch with a knot in buttonhole silk, as you can see on the buttonholes of the London finds, it makes for durable buttonholes that are easier to do straight, even and also look very pretty. Also note the round buttonholes without thread bars in the end, just as a medieval buttonhole should look. Also my lacing holes are sewn in silk with buttonhole stitch.
Here you can see another thing inspired by the London findings, a thing silk edge weave, tone in tone silk to match the fabric of the dress. I used DeVere silk treads in the colour Cigar and thread thickness 36 and three cards that were threaded in all holes both as warp and weft, to weave was really boring actually. It was so slow, but I love the end result. Subtle but very nice and it makes the edge more durable.

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The backside looks alight, not as pretty as in the front but it is ok the buttons are 5 mm from the edge, and then the edge weaves comes and is 3mm wide. I should have put the even close to the edge, next time I might dare more.

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Then it was time to do buttons, tiny tiny buttons and in the end it became 31 on each arm, so a grand total of 62 buttons.

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So close that they almost touch.

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Here you can see the lacing holes and also the string that I made for the spiral lacing. I card weaved it in the same silk as the edge weave and it was even more boring. Six or eight cards threaded in all four holes with DeVere silk thickness 36.
What you can’t see is that all the edges are stab stitched, around the neckline, in the front and around the hem of the sleeve and buttonhole side. Just as in the Greenland findings. It makes the edge less prone to stretching and also keeps it very flat and nice.

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This is the result and I am very happy with it. It will fit better after some wear as always with wool the dress needs to “settle” on the body. After one sweaty day in Visby it was a lot better already.

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The wobbliness that you see here will most likely be gone after some wear, it is due to the side panels being on bias.

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The “prettyness” picture that shoes all that I love with this dress; tiny buttons, pretty buttonholes, edge weave in silk, side panels, lots of hips

The yellow dress – or the housebook dress.

It always starts with the idea, I see someone in a outfit that makes the gears in my head turn furiously. So I do a lot of looking at pictures, on paintings and then I sketch my idea. The sketches always look something like this.

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Many lines and text, explaining to myself what my idea is, the drawings are not made for someone else to look at, only so that I can remember that great idea I had about that specific detail.

I have collected my “housebook” dress pictures on a separate pinterest board, if you wish to have a look.

This dress is interesting, with the silly pleated part in the front, the low cut neck. There is a lot of details in the look and as always what I find interesting is “how does this work with my boobs?!

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And as always when dealing with a difficult model, I start with a toille. Drawing new lines, cutting it up after those lines and making it work. The front piece is a square, and then the shape for the bust is pinned to this piece, this makes all the shaping for the bust invisible, as on the finished garment it looks like straight lines.

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The pieces, now comes the real pattern work.

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The old darts of the toille is cut away and then put together to close up the pattern pieces for one single pattern piece without the seam. Some of the width is lost, but if it is only this small amount you will not notice it.

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The pattern when finished looks like this I have added a skirt piece that widens in stead of putting in gores. As the paintings show no visible lines for gores in the skirt, and they show every other seams there is. The pictures show wide hems, so I did this and also have 75cm of fabric in the front and back pleated panels.

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Here we have the panels, my panels are 75cm wide, and the front panel have a slit down the front to allow for an opening of the dress centre front.

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I have a sturdy linen as a base for my panels.

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I decided to make rolled pleats. Many recreations have stuffed cartridge pleating, but looking on the paintings and drawings they never have more then ten pleats, but very wide hems on the dresses, so I decided that even if there is no “evidence” for rolled pleats in this period they would be perfect. There is no need for stuffing the pleats, they fall just as in the pictures and you can get a lot of fabric to fit on a small area.

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They are made like this, They are sewn onto the linen linings with running stitches.

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then they are rolled one at a time and secured like this.

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The dress is then sewn and the pleated panels inserted in the front, they are attached at the top like this.

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I decided to do the open back sleeves, so here we have lacing holes, they look like golden silk suns.

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They are backed with a sturdy linen.

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I sew in silk with buttonhole stitches, as this makes for neater and sturdier buttonholes, and it is also the period way to do.

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The neckline is a single fold hem finished with stab stitching and on the back with a filler thread.

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Last thing is to finish the hem. I always put the dress on, make someone put one needle in each seam at the height of where I want my hem. Then I take it of, fold the dress in half and make a nice line working from these needles.

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As I did not want to take away the wools ability to stretch and shape around the body, I only put lining around the waist, where I wanted to make sure that there was no tension on the pleated panels. If they strain you can be sure that the hidden lacing will show. There is a corsets steel behind the lacing holes, to keep it all straight and nice. I guess the period way would to have reeds there in stead of modern spring steel.
The Lining is only secured in the back with big stitches, and then in the side seams and at the front on the pleated panel.

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A picture on neat seams in the inside.

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I have hooks and eyes in the top, as the lacing only goes up to the height of the pleated panel.

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The sleeves have one continuous lace, I did not work that well to have it free so I have stitched it to keep it from bunching up when wearing the dress.

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There is many pictures with elaborate veils, so I was inspired to make something that looks like “Meister des Amsterdamer Kabinetts: Das Gothaer Liebespaar” so I made a paper guide where I made a hole in each crossing with a big needle and then made dots on a thin linen fabric with the help of a pen.

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The long lines was couched in silk.

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And then I made stars with the same silk but another tone over each crossing.

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Some details in the front.

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Sadly there was not enough silk to make the last three stars, but this place is hidden in the back and never visible.

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Under the dress I wear my Lengberg castle brassiere, and to wear over that I made a now hemd, I use the same method as in my kampfrau tutorial, but in stead of the high neck I choose to make it low and only honeycomb smock and to have less fabric in the body.

Then there came the problem of closure of the top of the dress. When I saw the big golden closure of THIS and THIS ladies I was in love, but with no metal working skills there was no way that I could make them.

But then suddenly I saw this blog post. And of course! I can make one like that to.

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So I turned to good old Etsy and ordered a pile of golden filigrees and started building. Layering the filigrees gave it a very nice solid look.

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To top it all of I needed a wulstahube that was so big that it looked really silly. This was important for me, to make it so high that I could almost not wear it. There are numerous pictures of really big wulsthaubes in period artwork, and as I love the silly headdresses I wanted to top this silly dress of with something equally silly. As stuffing this wulst with fabric would make it to heavy I turned to thin birch branches that I made into a wulst and padded with linen wrapping.

The yellow dress - or the housebook dress - 53
And yes it turned into a really silly wulsthaube, it took me several weeks to decide if I could wear it. But I finally started to like the sillyness of the height.

And this is how the dress turned out, the yellow and golden dress.

The yellow dress - or the housebook dress - 54
The yellow dress - or the housebook dress - 55
The yellow dress - or the housebook dress - 56
The yellow dress - or the housebook dress - 57
The yellow dress - or the housebook dress - 58
The yellow dress - or the housebook dress - 59
The yellow dress - or the housebook dress - 60
The yellow dress - or the housebook dress - 61
The yellow dress - or the housebook dress - 62
The yellow dress - or the housebook dress - 63
The yellow dress - or the housebook dress - 64
The yellow dress - or the housebook dress - 65

My green dress

my green cotehardie
I realized that I have not really shown you my green dress, except for in a few pictures.
It is made out of a thinner tabby weave green wool from medeltidsmode.se and is completely hand sewn with linen thread.

my green cotehardie
I have based my model on Herjolfsnes no.38 from Greenland. I am not a fan of the GFD dresses but still wanted a dress that follows my body so this model with lots of panels in the side seemed perfect for the shaping over the bust. I Know that the original herjolfsnes dress was not made as a tight garment but I choose to make it tight anyway.
The reason for not liking the GFD is that I do not like how really tight they are, in my world clothing needs ease. A garment that have no ease tend to look like it is to small for the wearer. I have seen a lot of really nice GFD but with my bust size it tends to look like a over stuffed sausage. And also I prefer to have the front edge straight on the grain, that way I know that it will not warp under pressure and most GFD use the fitted front. My green dress is tight but not so tight as the GFD. I wear a modern bra under my dresses because I need that support but do not want to wear a dress that is that tight.

my green cotehardie
my green cotehardie
I have also chosen to make more of a grande assiette type of sleeve as the Moy bog dress, just because I wanted to try it out. I have also made e two part sleeve with the so called “elbow hinge” from the pourpoint of Charles de Blois that cottesimple.com describes.
my green cotehardie
In the making my armholes turned out to big. But sewing some gartering threads and then using steam on it solved this problem a bit, I love wool.

my green cotehardie
I have also chosen to make it with buttons as the Moy bog dress, because buttons are pretty and I like sewing buttonholes.

my green cotehardie
Lots and lots of buttons!

my green cotehardie
my green cotehardie
my green cotehardie
This was my first medieval dress ever and I wanted to try out everything I had read about ;)

Under it I wear a simple linen under dress, It might look a tad bit short, but with this length you don’t get the problem with a wet linen hem against your skin when walking in wet grass or on rainy days. Wet linen is not that nice.
my green cotehardie

There are some things that I am not 100% satisfied with on this dress. The fit in the armhole is one, but after a few times wear it moulded to my body and looks better then from the beginning. So I really like this dress, it is my first try but the shape of it works well on my body and the many panels in the sides makes it easy to fit.
I love the amount of width in the bottom that is due to the panels. One might think that it is wasteful to make but when cutting it out there was a minimal amount of waste. When laid out on the fabric correctly the only scraps you get is in the neck hole, armhole and thin strips in between the pattern pieces.

another wool dress

I’m addicted to wool dresses, the material is just totally superior to anything else. So my new dress is also in wool, and empire waisted to and with a balloon skirt, so you see a pattern? This is also one of my after school projects.

another woll dress in the making
It is just mostly pinned on the dummy on this picture.

new damask fabric

I guess that I was a bit crazy weaving damask the first time, but after the first weave, I decided to weave damask again. This time I wanted to make a fabric for a old fashion carpetbag. To try out new materials in my warp I used flax for it, and then a one thread wool yarn for the weft. This fabric is very durable and “almost indestructible” and have the right weight for a bag, sturdy and nice.
damask weave nr2

I decided to make different symbols this time, symbols representing me.
corset – because I love them so, to wear, to look at and to make.
computer – I spend far to many hours in front of the computer, I can not live without it.
dress form – I sew and a dress from is a good representative of this.
a crown – because I like pretty things (and it turned out so nicely in the last weave).
dress – since I am a dress loving gal.
damask weave nr2 - liftplan

The warp was supposed to last for fabric for two bags, it was supposed to be two meters of fabric (about two yards), but I did a miss counting and forgot to take the loom waste of one meters (about one yard) in the calculation for the warp so after weaving one meter I saw that I had just to little warp left to be able to weave one more bag. So I had to wrap it up quickly and got half a meter out of it which is not enough for a bag on its own, but with some supplemental fabric it can become a bag some day.
damask weave nr2 - detail

Weaving this went fine, but the warp was a bit unevenly tensed so I had some problems with threads acting up, especially in the end as the warp gets more sensitive.
damask weave nr2 - yarn

I just love the color of the yarn, I have a cold brown and a gray yarn
damask weave nr2 - yarn close up

the gray little wool dress

Is finished!
gray wool dress - front
gray wool dress - back

I am really pleased with how this one turned out, it is in Italian wool and do want a bigger petticoat then what I have on in these pictures (I only have a normal skirt under it) The band under the bust is removable and was originally planned to be at the waist, but that looked really strange. It made my upper body look really short, But I do have a short upper body, and the big boobs does not really help with that.
gray wool dress - bow

Oh and the BOW! I just love how the bow turned out :) and the stripes as well, I just love them. I love everything on this dress and I think that it is the best dress that I have made so far.
gray wool dress - lines

The other entry on this dress can be found here